Sunday, May 09, 2010

Lena Horne Has Passed Away at the Age of 92



From the NYTimes:

Lena Horne, Singer and Actress, Dies at 92
By ALJEAN HARMETZ
Published: May 9, 2010


Lena Horne, who was the first black performer to be signed to a long-term contract by a major Hollywood studio and who went on to achieve international fame as a singer, died on Sunday night at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York. She was 92 and lived in Manhattan.

Her death was announced by her son-in-law, Kevin Buckley.

Ms. Horne might have become a major movie star, but she was born 50 years too early, and languished at MGM in the 1940s because of the color of her skin, although she was so light-skinned that, when she was a child, other black children had taunted her, accusing her of having a “white daddy.”

Ms. Horne was stuffed into one “all-star” musical after another — “Thousands Cheer” (1943), “Broadway Rhythm” (1944), “Two Girls and a Sailor” (1944), “Ziegfeld Follies” (1946), “Words and Music” (1948) — to sing a song or two that could easily be snipped from the movie when it played in the South, where the idea of an African-American performer in anything but a subservient role in a movie with an otherwise all-white cast was unthinkable.

“The only time I ever said a word to another actor who was white was Kathryn Grayson in a little segment of ‘Show Boat’ ” included in “Till the Clouds Roll By” (1946), a movie about the life of Jerome Kern, Ms. Horne said in an interview in 1990. In that sequence she played Julie, a mulatto forced to flee the showboat because she has married a white man.

But when MGM made “Show Boat” into a movie for the second time, in 1951, the role of Julie was given to a white actress, Ava Gardner, who did not do her own singing. (Ms. Horne was no longer under contract to MGM at the time, and according to James Gavin’s Horne biography, “Stormy Weather,” published last year, she was never seriously considered for the part.) And in 1947, when Ms. Horne herself married a white man — the prominent arranger, conductor and pianist Lennie Hayton, who was for many years both her musical director and MGM’s — the marriage took place in France and was kept secret for three years.

Ms. Horne’s first MGM movie was “Panama Hattie” (1942), in which she sang Cole Porter’s “Just One of Those Things.” Writing about that film years later, Pauline Kael called it “a sad disappointment, though Lena Horne is ravishing and when she sings you can forget the rest of the picture.”

Even before she came to Hollywood, Brooks Atkinson, the drama critic for The New York Times, noticed Ms. Horne in “Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1939,” a Broadway revue that ran for nine performances. “A radiantly beautiful sepia girl,” he wrote, “who will be a winner when she has proper direction.”

SEE FULL POST



She had proper direction in two all-black movie musicals, both made in 1943. Lent to 20th Century Fox for “Stormy Weather,” one of those show business musicals with almost no plot but lots of singing and dancing, Ms. Horne did both triumphantly, ending with the sultry, aching sadness of the title number, which would become one of her signature songs. In MGM’s “Cabin in the Sky,” the first film directed by Vincente Minnelli, she was the brazen, sexy handmaiden of the Devil. (One number she shot for that film, “Ain’t It the Truth,” which she sang while taking a bubble bath, was deleted before the film was released — not for racial reasons, as her stand-alone performances in other MGM musicals sometimes were, but because it was considered too risqué.)
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Ms. Horne later claimed that for this and other reasons, including her friendship with leftists like Paul Robeson and W.E.B. DuBois, she was blacklisted and “unable to do films or television for the next seven years” after her tenure with MGM ended in 1950.


Rest of obituary at link above.































06 Apr 1964, London, England, UK --- American singer and actress Lena Horne, in London to appear at the London Palladium. --- Image by © Hulton-Deutsch Collection/CORBIS


















Books:

Stormy Weather: The Life of Lena Horne , James Gavin (Author)

The Hornes: An American Family, Gail Lumet Buckley (Author), Horne, Lena (Author)

2 comments:

The Angry Independent said...

You are so fast Rikyrah, :). Lightning quick.

Loved Lena Horne.

Even enjoyed the old race films from the 40's.

The Sanford and Son episode is a classic for me. lol

Her impact is incalculable.

When I look at Black leading "ladies" today... frustration & rage sets in for me. Blacks have gone from Lena Horne to the likes of Beyonce and Rihanna. (WTF). That's one hell of a long fall. Part of the reason why the Black image is in the toilet.

It's amazing that during the time of Jim Crow, when faced all sorts of oppression and obstacles, Blacks had a much better image... much better representatives. I cringe when I think about the Black image today.

rikyrah said...

It's amazing that during the time of Jim Crow, when faced all sorts of oppression and obstacles, Blacks had a much better image... much better representatives. I cringe when I think about the Black image today.

THIS.

why do you think I'm so hard on 'hip hop'?

I think they're modern day minstrels.

Black folk, up until this group, as a whole, would fight AGAINST the attempt to degrade us with stereotypes. WE were the ones who stood up and said

THIS IS NOT WHO WE ARE.

Until this batch of minstrels.

They are the biggest Sambos to come down the pike, and should be called out as such.